Hockey World Blog

Bauer Supreme Total ONE NXG Hockey Stick Review: Initial Impressions

Bauer was kind enough to send Hockey World Blog three sticks for review, one of which being the Bauer Supreme Total ONE NXG. After recently reviewing the Warrior Covert DT1, which I find to be an excellent stick, my bar was set rather high.  Here is my review.

Specs: Bauer Supreme Total ONE NXG, Zetterberg curve, 87 Flex

Modifications: None

Appearance and Design: Heading Bauer’s Supreme line, the Bauer Supreme Total ONE NXG sports a black with white and yellow accent color combination. The black base stick reads BAUER at both the top and the bottom of the stick.  Identically, TOTAL ONE NXG is also displayed at both ends of the stick as well. Nothing much to it, but nor does it need to be. The simple yet attractive design can easily be identified as Bauer, and on that note, they’ve done their job.

The Supreme Total ONE NXG uses an amplified mid-kick combined with a .520 power taper. The technology combined aims at providing maximum energy output by utilizing a stiffer lower shaft with a more flexible, softer middle. The stick is geared for getting your weight on the bottom part of the shaft, loading the flex, and launching “explosive one-tmers” and bombing the “heavy slapshot”. 

Balance & Feel: At 402 grams, the NXG is the lightest of the top-end sticks. The shaft has square corners with raised tactile ridges for better feel and improved grip. The Total ONE NXG utilizes Bauer’s Monocomp Technology; “a single molding process” that removes “excess materials like overlapping layers, resin and foam waste, the balance of the stick is improved and overall weight is reduce.” To further reduce the weight of the stick, Bauer also uses TeXtreme Technology, an ultra lightweight and strong carbon fiber that is 20% lighter than conventional carbon.

Shooting and Accuracy: The Supreme Power Shaft is a double concave taper that, in conjunction with the mid-kick, minimizes shaft deflection for improved energy optimization. In layman’s terms, as the shaft bends for the shot, the shaft itself does not twist, allowing for the blade to be aligned for accuracy.

The blade has an expanded throat that increases rigidity. Made of a Dual-Density Blade Core, the aramid-reinforced (strong synthetic fibers) Power Core 3 enhances feel and increases, yet again, torsional stiffness to minimize blade deflection while shooting for increased accuracy.

Overall Impressions: There is a reason Bauer is considered the leading manufacturer of hockey sticks. The Bauer Supreme Total ONE NXG is, with all of its technology, an elite hockey stick. The lightest stick out there among its competition, yet the mid-kick still provides the stiffness to withstand the heaviest of loading. And there, is, where I ran into problems.

Let me preface this with a few words; you want to buy this stick. Yes, you most definitely want to buy this stick. The one catch, clause, footnote; you need to know your playing capability. A mid-kick point is something you need to get used to, something you need to learn and perfect. That Stamkos like perfection, however, is not easily obtainable without the proper flex. At 87 flex, I’m still having trouble with the kick point and loading my stick. Would I go to a lower flex? Most likely not. My point, is for those who typically choose the stiffest of flexes, may wish to dial it down a notch. The NXG provides a very stiff flex, more so than what the flex says.

The feel of the stick is amazing, both passing and shooting for both forehand and backhand. From the first time I picked it up I immediately felt like I’ve been using it forever. My stick-handling has improved, my passes are spot on and my shooting is extremely accurate.

My only complaint is the 60″ length of the stick. At 5′ 11″, the stick is a half-an-inch to an inch shorter than what I’m used to. For anyone over 6′ 0″, I can only imagine the displeasure they may have if they prefer longer sticks. Still, I have become accustomed to the length, and, while playing forward, I have definitely noticed its benefits in the tight spaces.

The Bauer Supreme Total ONE NXG will set you back a bit at $259.99. The price however, for the lightest stick out there and excellent technology, is well worth the price tag. With no durability issues in sight, it is a stick you invest in to help you become a better player.

Readers receive a 10% discount at PureHockey.com by using coupon code “HOCKEYWORLD”.

Follow on Twitter @HWBEB.

13 Comments

  1. Matt

    November 16, 2012 at 1:31 am

    The main problem I have with this stick is that the paint chips so easily, however it does not effect the durability. I have had the stick for about a month and it looks like I’ve had it for 6 months. Other than that, it’s a great stick.

    • EB

      November 16, 2012 at 8:02 am

      I have yet to experience any paint chipping (have had it for at least a month), but I will keep track of that now that you point that out.

      Thanks Matt.

      • Matt

        November 19, 2012 at 11:29 pm

        I think the difference is that you were using the non-grip version, where as I have the grip version. My buddy has the non-grip and it definitely doesn’t chip as easily.

      • Jim Miller

        January 3, 2014 at 3:26 pm

        bought one in chicago at the Bauer invitational in November. just out of warranty the top of the stick cracked after my son (14) took a slap shot. it was a senior stick. not impressed for $260

  2. alex

    December 11, 2012 at 1:55 pm

    i was wondering how the durability is on the stcik because i cant afford to go through them like water.. to me its this or the nexus 1000

    • EB

      December 11, 2012 at 3:03 pm

      I have had no issues with the Total ONE NXG for durability. Either Bauer Nexus 1000 or the Total One NXG should be fine in the durability department, as well as performance. Use code ‘HOCKEYWORLD’ at Purehockey.com to save 10% on most items.

  3. Sam

    December 23, 2012 at 8:45 pm

    Would you recommend this stick over the ccm rbz or the reebok ai9? Also, how’s the puck feel and durability compared to the warrior covert dt1? Thanks.

  4. Dakota

    February 7, 2013 at 9:42 pm

    How would you compare this stick to the CCM RBZ? I’m looking to buy one and want to know your opinion on which on to buy.

    • EB

      February 8, 2013 at 12:28 pm

      Both Chris and I spoke comparing the two sticks. Both sticks are durable, and both have benefits. It comes down to your play style. The CCM RBZ does increase your shot velocity, so if you like booming slapshots, it is the stick for you. If you are a player who likes to control the puck more, the Bauer offers a better feel for the puck.

      The one thing we did notice and feel should be considered is that if you decide to cut down the CCM RBZ, it throws off the balance. The stick weight feels awkward and toe heavy. The Bauer does not have this problem.

      Me personally, I like the Bauer Total ONE NXG. Slapshots are cool, but you puck handle a lot more than you shoot. But I am a playmaker, so take my advice as you see fit.

      Both sticks can be purchased at PureHockey.com using the coupon code ‘Hockeyworld’.

      Hope this helps.

  5. wyatt

    March 5, 2013 at 1:50 pm

    hey i have the NXG grip and it does chip like crazy, it doesnt have the bauer logo down at bottom anymore….very dissapointed also cuz the foam in blade breaks too easy

  6. Dave

    June 7, 2013 at 4:21 pm

    This is the worst stick I’ve ever purchased. I spent $250 on a custom stick for my son who’s 13. it broke after 5 weeks. I was with him every time he used it and he did nothing out of the ordinary to make it break. Called customer service and the woman was a complete b**** to me telling me that she was sure that he did something to cause the stick to break. Wouldn’t take the stick back so now I won’t buy anything Bauer again. CCM and Easton will be our hockey gear of choice.

    • Ron

      January 1, 2014 at 3:59 pm

      Why would you buy a 13-year old a $250 stick?

  7. Thomas

    February 16, 2014 at 9:57 am

    I’ve had 2 nxgs and the blade has cracked on both of them, one on the toe and one on the heel. I love the nxg for everything else except that I’ve broken two. What would you recomend nxg or rbz? Is there that big of a difference between the stage 1 and stage 2 besides the price of course?

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