Hockey World Blog

CCM RBZ SpeedBurner Hockey Stick Review

ccm-rbz-speedburner-stick

The CCM RBZ line of hockey sticks has been one of my favorites over the past few years. They provide solid game-improvement performance—particularly when it comes to shot power—and I’ve had very good experiences with durability. Plus, so far, every new generation of the stick has outperformed its predecessor. So how does the 4th generation CCM RBZ SpeedBurner hockey stick compare to the rest? Check out our review below. And thanks to our friends at CCM for continually sending us demo models to review!

Specifications:

  • CCM RBZ SpeedBurner hockey stick
  • 60” length
  • 424 grams
  • 85 Flex
  • ccmP40 pattern (Hossa)
  • Grip Finish
  • Modifications: Cut down roughly 1.5 inches

Features:

  • Premier Carbon Composite
  • PowerHosel Technology
  • Power Swing Technology
  • Variable (custom) Kick Point
  • TaylorMade SpeedPocket Technology blade

Design and Construction:

The RBZ SpeedBurner hockey stick builds on the success of the RBZ SuperFast, the third generation top-end twig in the RBZ line. The Speedburner introduces new PowerHosel technology, which offers a reinforced hosel with a support rib to enhance explosiveness, durability and accuracy. PowerHosel was designed specifically for the SpeedPocket Blade, which is unique and exclusive to CCM.

The hollow, foamless SpeedPocket blade offers more C.O.R. (Coefficient of Restitution)—or the amount of energy ccmcms-productgallery-hsspdbrnrbtransferred from the blade to the puck—than any other blade on the market. This essentially drives more power into the shot. It is also designed to improve puck feel and enable the SpeedBurner to be well-balanced since it requires less materials than a traditional foam-filled blade.

The SpeedBurner also boasts a constant flex profile with a variable kick point. Depending on the placement of the lower hand, the location of the kick point will change to better benefit a player’s needs. When the hand is slid down the shaft to crank out a big slap shot or one-timer, the stick responds in a powerful way similar to how a mid kick reacts. On the other hand, when a player needs to get the puck off in a hurry and their hand is placed higher on the stick, the SpeedBurner will react like a low kick stick and give the player a quick shot release.

Performance:

Like I said earlier, the RBZ line has been one of my favorites the past few years—and the SpeedBurner is another solid offering in the lineup. However, this is the first one in the series that I didn’t feel like it really improved on the previous generation model.

The best part of the RBZ twigs has always been the shot power—especially on slapshots. Sure, the SpeedBurner still provides some wicked shot power for slapshots that’s better than most of the sticks out there, it just doesn’t improve much on the previous generation stick. Is that a bad thing? Not necessarily. Like I said, the enhanced power the SpeedBurner offers is still better than 90 percent of the sticks on the market right now. And, alternatively, I felt like I got more zing on my wrist shots. A lot of this has to do with the SpeedPocket blade and the improved C.O.R. It’s weird to say it, but you can really feel the enhanced energy transfer. I could actually feel the puck coming off the blade with more power.

ccm-rbz-speedburner-stick-2One area where the SpeedBurner improves on previous sticks is with the balance and puck feel. This has been a trend that I’ve noticed with the RBZ sticks over the years. Each one feels a little better balanced and improves on puck feel. These two performance areas are important, and while the SpeedBurner is an improvement in the RBZ line in these categories, I’d say the stick is on par with most other high-end sticks on the market today. Overall, I felt very comfortable using this stick and handling the puck with it.

In terms of durability, I’ve found the RBZ line to be quite durable—and the SpeedBurner is no exception. After several months of use, the stick is still going strong. The SpeedBurner just feels solid. No creaks when I flex the stick, no small chips rattling around inside, and even the outer surface has held up well with minimal chipping. I’m very happy with how the stick has performed from an endurance perspective.

Overall Impressions:

CCM seems dedicated to continually improving the RBZ line to make it a solid all-around stick, and the SpeedBurner moves the line closer to that goal. Some aspects of the SpeedBurner aren’t a huge improvement over previous RBZ models, but overall, when you compare it to other top-end sticks on the market today, the SpeedBurner holds its own.

Enhanced shot power is a staple of this line, and while the SpeedBurner may not improve much in this area, it’s still better than most out there now. I’ve always thought the RBZ line would be better for defenseman because of this improved shot power, but the SpeedBurner offers better all-around performance than some of the previous sticks. The constant flex profile is a great component that a wide variety of players will enjoy, and the SpeedPocket blade works great to improve not just energy transfer, but puck feel as well. Couple those factors with the stick’s durability and you have a really good stick for a wide variety of players.

Where to buy?

Looking to purchase the CCM RBZ SpeedBurner? Check out Inline and Ice Warehouse where you can get the stick for $269.99 plus free shipping.

3 Comments

  1. Sam

    September 2, 2015 at 4:28 pm

    For a Varsity High School player is it worth it to pay the extra $100 for the newest improved model?

    • Chris

      September 4, 2015 at 7:57 pm

      The SpeedBurner is a solid stick, but I think you’ll find a negligible difference in terms of performance between it and the SuperFast. Save yourself the money and see if you can get a SuperFast on sale. Inline Warehouse currently has them for $180.

      Thanks for reading!

  2. Doug

    February 4, 2016 at 5:06 pm

    My 13 year old son has gone through 3 of these this year due to the toe chipping excessively. The hollow blade is weak and breaks down quickly.

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